Safety Tips for Back to School

bigstock-Watch-Out-For-Children-427446As children across Middlesex County head #backtoschool this week, they will again be sharing the roads with school buses, other young pedestrians, and bicyclists.  Whether your children walk, ride their bike, or take the bus, help ensure they take the proper safety precautions​.

Children who walk to school:  When walking, stay on the sidewalk if one is available. If the street does not have a sidewalk, walk facing the traffic so as to have a clear view of the traffic.  When crossing a street,  look left, right and left again to see if any cars, buses, or bicyclists are coming.  If possible, make a point to set time aside to practice walking their route to school.  Together you can use pedestrians signals, ensure they are crossing streets correctly, and get a good idea of the path they are taking.

Children who bike to school: When riding a bike to and from school, children should always wear a proper fitted helmet and sneakers at all times. The same procedures apply when crossing the street.  Riders must come to complete stop, look left, right and left again, and always walk their bike across the street. Parents should practice and teach children the rules of the road to help insure they get to school safe and sound.

Children who ride the bus to school: Rain or shine, the big yellow bus gets the children to school. To ensure a safe ride to school, make sure children stand six feet away from the curb when a bus is pulling up or driving away. Remind children to fasten their seat belts and to remain seated throughout the ride.  While it’s exciting to chat with friends, children should keep  screaming and jumping for the playground and home so that the driver can focus on the road.

Regardless of how children make their way to school, we wish everyone a safe and enjoyable school year!

Big Game Day Safety Tips

This Sunday marks the day football fans across the US wait for all year – the Big Game!   Whether you are hosting or attending a local gathering, be sure to play it smart and be safe.

Are you hosting?

1. Be sure your guests have designated drivers or check whether they have planned to use Uber or Lyft.

2.Keep the numbers of local cabs handy.

3. Serve high protein foods and make sure to have plenty of water and non-alcoholic drinks on hand.

4. Stop serving alcohol at the beginning of the 4th quarter.  Brew a large pot of coffee or tea and serve dessert.

 

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Are you attending a party or joining friends at a local bar?

1. Pace yourself and make sure to eat and alternate with water or other non-alcohol paintings.

2. Be sure to have a designated driver or give your keys to your party host.

3. Stop drinking at the beginning of the 4th quarter and order a coffee.

 

Remember the Big Game is supposed to a fun gathering with family and friends, together cheering and celebrating.  Be safe and be smart.

 

Tips Source: http://www.nj.gov/oag/Superbowl-SafetyTips(2×3).pdf

Winter Walking Safety Tips

http://health.sunnybrook.ca/wellness/safety-tips-winter-walking-snow/

Photo Credit *

Now that the winter has arrived temperatures will be dropping and snow will fall from the sky. With snow comes ice, and with ice comes slips and falls. Mother Nature might be the one to blame for the sleet and snow, but who is to blame for the slips and falls?

As a pedestrian it’s your job to be aware of your surroundings at all times. If you know that snow is headed your way make sure to plan ahead. Here’s how:

Before you walk out the door, make sure that you wear the proper footwear. Proper footwear should place the entire foot on the surface of the ground, like sneakers or snow boots. You should avoid a smooth sole and shoes with flat bottoms.

While walking on snow or icy sidewalks or parking lots, always walk consciously. Be sure to take your time and don’t rush. People think that by looking down while walking helps, when really this isn’t true. Instead of looking down, you should look up and see where your feet will move next. This method allows you to anticipate ice or any uneven surfaces. Along with taking your time, you should occasionally scan from left to right to ensure that you aren’t in the way of vehicles or other hazards.

Injuries during the winter aren’t always from slipping on ice, but can also result from falling snow/ice as it blows, melts, or breaks away from awnings, buildings, etc. If you are a home or business owner, make sure sidewalks and walkways (and any overhangs) are cleared of any snow, ice or other slippery materials that could get in the way of the pedestrian.

Whether you’re walking to and from parking lots, between buildings at work, or even at home on your sidewalk, walk cautious and walk alert. Slips and falls are the most frequent types of injuries that occur during the winter season. No matter how well the snow and ice is removed from parking lots and sidewalks, it’s imperative to walk smart.

 

*http://health.sunnybrook.ca/wellness/safety-tips-winter-walking-snow/

Back to School Safety

Picture Source: http://www.nsc.org/learn/safety-knowledge/Pages/back-to-school-safety-tips-for-drivers.aspx

Picture Source: http://www.nsc.org/learn/safety-knowledge/Pages/back-to-school-safety-tips-for-drivers.aspx

With #backtoschool in full swing, many of us have noticed the inevitable; more cars and more congestion.  Back to school means sharing the roads and slowing down. There are school buses picking up kids from multiple stops, kids on bikes are rushing to get to school on time, and parents are trying to drop their kids off before work.

If you are someone who is dropping off your kids to school, make sure that the area is clear before letting them get out of the car. More children are hit by cars/buses near schools than at any other location, according to the National Safe Routes to School program. Before dropping off your kids be sure you are not double parked. This blocks visibility for other vehicles passing by. Do not drop off your kids across the street from their school, even though it may be more convenient for you. Carpooling is also a great way to reduce the number of vehicles around the school, which decreases the chances of a child getting hit.  Don’t block crosswalks- especially when you are stopped at a red light. Be sure to give the pedestrians the right away, whether they are walking or riding a bike. When you are in school zone and flashers are blinking, be sure to come to a complete stop and watch for children. Lastly, do your best to watch out for your children in school zones, playgrounds and residential areas, as well as the other children around them.

During school hours, there will be more and more school buses on the roads. If you are ever driving behind a school bus, you should always allow a greater following distance than you would driving behind a car. This then allows you to have more time to stop once the bus puts on it’s yellow flashing lights. Never pass a school bus if you are stopped behind them while they are picking up children. It is illegal in all 50 states to pass a school bus that is stopped to load or unload children. Passing a school bus from either direction on an undivided road, can potentially put children who are loading or unloading in danger if they are unaware that you are coming.

We are all responsible – as pedestrians and drivers, to make #backtoschool a safe return!