Share the Road

share_the_roadOur roads are intended to be shared by cyclists, motorist and pedestrians too!  And yet, we may not be aware of “the rules” of sharing the road.  KMM has put together a helpful list of the most important tips we should all review before we get behind handlebars or a wheel.

Communicate your intentions

Cyclists, use hand signals consistently.  Motorists, use turn signals in advance of turning to let everyone know your intentions.

Everybody Follows the Same Rules

Cyclists are safer when riding in the same direction as motorists and follow all the same rules as motorists.  Motorists come to a full stop when at a stop sign and do not speed through a yellow light to avoid the wait at a red light.

The Road Looks Different

Cyclists, scan the road ahead to have enough time to signal if you need to move out of the way.  Motorists, sewer grates, broken glass, gravel and puddles are all hazards to cyclists.  Always leave a three-foot buffer in the event a cyclist needs to move out of their lane.

Everybody Wins With Courtesy

Cyclists, the more courtesy you are with motorists, the more courtesy drivers will be.  Motorists, giving cyclists extra respect and consideration creates a safer environment for everyone.

Horns

Cyclists, NJ law requires all bikes be equipped with a horn or bell so that your presence is greatly increased.  Motorists, although the horn is used as a safety tool, it can be dangerous if used in extreme proximity to a cyclist.  A light tap on the horn is sufficient.

Managing Electronic Devices

Both cyclists and motorist, leave the cell phones, iPods and blackberry in your bags and not in your hands as you are driving or riding.  By doing so, you are keeping everyone safe.

And don’t forget, pedestrians have rights too!  Both cyclists and motorists are required by law to yield for pedestrians in crosswalks.  While pedestrians have the responsibility to be visible and predictable when using a crosswalk, cyclists and motorists can observe each others actions when approaching a crosswalk to anticipate a pedestrian using a crosswalk.

For more information, visit www.kmm.org for all your transportation needs.

 

Photo credit: www.thinkbicycles.org

Check Twice – July 31 is National Heatstroke Prevention Day

Tomorrow, July 31, is National Heatstroke Prevention Day and we at KMM would like to share with you some safety tips everyone can use.  Let’s prevent this ver terrible tragedy from occurring.   wheresbaby_4c_horz

When outside temperatures are in the low 80s, the temperature inside a vehicle can reach deadly levels in only 10 minutes, even with a window rolled down two inches. Children’s bodies overheat easily, and infants and children under four years old are at the greatest risk for heat-related illness.

KMM, along with NHTSA, Safe Kids and its safety partners, are urging parents and caregivers to take the following precautions to prevent heat stroke incidents from occurring:

  • Never leave a child unattended in a vehicle — even if the windows are partially open or the engine is running and the air conditioning is on;
  • Make a habit of looking in the vehicle — front and back — before locking the door and walking away;
  • Ask the childcare provider to call if the child does not show up for care as expected;
  • Do things that serve as a reminder that a child is in the vehicle, such as placing a purse or briefcase in the back seat to ensure no child is accidentally left in the vehicle, or writing a note or using a stuffed animal placed in the driver’s view to indicate a child is in the car seat; and,
  • Teach children that a vehicle is not a play area and store keys out of a child’s reach.

 

Information source: NHTSA website

5 Tips for Driving in the Rain

kmm driving in the rain tipsSummer brings long days, warm weather and more time spent enjoying the outdoors.  However, the occasional (or more-like weekly, these days) thunderstorms also make their summer appearance as the skies open and deluge us with heavy, blinding rain.

While it’s safest to stay off the roads during these heavy storms, sometimes the rain comes quickly and fierce.  KMM shares with you five important tips for driving in the rain.

  1. First and foremost, drive slow and focused.
  2. If driving on a highway, drive in the center lane since water tends to pool on the left and right lanes.
  3. If your wipers are on, so should your lights.  This keeps you visible to other drivers and helps you navigate the blinding rain too!
  4. Never drive through moving water, especially if you can’t see the roadway.
  5. Follow the tread marks of the car ahead of you and make sure to keep at least 5 seconds of driving distance between you and the car ahead of you.

New Brunswick Ciclovia is Coming!

Ciclovia7.12 eventKMM is getting ready for the next New Brunswick Ciclovia, coming on Saturday July 12th!

Ciclovia is an open streets event that encourages New Brunswick residents and visitors of all ages to get physically active through biking, walking, skating, and programmed activities on closed city streets. KMM is partnering with Safe Kids Middlesex County to bring mini bike skills course to Remsen Avenue.

The July 12th event features an all-new route that connects New Brunswick’s downtown and residential neighborhoods with the Cook/Douglas campus of Rutgers University.  Plan ahead and check out the Cicolovia map!

To learn more about the program, be sure to visit the New Brunswick Ciclovia’s website.