Distracted Driving – The Basics

driving_putyourphonedownsignDistracted Driving is any activity that could divert a person’s attention away from their primary task of driving.  Types of distractions besides texting and using a cell phone include: eating and drinking, grooming, reading including maps, adjusting a radio or CD player. But because text messaging requires visual, manual and cognitive attention, it is by far the most alarming distraction.  Cell phone use may not be the only distraction for drivers, but when you combine the risk with the frequency and prevalence, the reason for putting an end to this deadly behavior becomes clear.

Sending or receiving a text takes a driver’s eyes from the road for an average of 4-6 seconds. When driving 55 mph, this is the equivalent of driving the length of an entire football field BLIND.

 

What can we as drivers do immediately to avoid distraction?

  • put down the cell phone
  • pull over to talk or text
  • eat or drink only when the vehicle is stopped
  • pre-select your music playlist before starting out
  • take care of grooming at home

Small steps will make a big difference. Drivers who used their cell phones and were involved in a crash didn’t start their call with the intention of injuring or killing another person or themselves. Don’t become a statistic! You are driving a 2 ton vehicle. There’s a lot going on around you.

Stay focused. Stay alive.

Join INN

INNIn the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy in October 2012, one thing was clear. Information is key and getting it fast is essential. With widespread power outages, many of our commuters depended on their smart phone to get information during and after the storm. Armed with this knowledge, KMM has completely re-invented the ETN to give subscribers a greater degree of information delivered right to their smart phones.

KMM is proud to introduce Middlesex County Information Notification Network – be in the INN and get the information you need.

INN is customizable based on the type of information the user is seeking. INN offers traffic alerts, train alerts, bus alerts, municipal alerts and ozone alerts, in addition to the many other options. Users can receive this information via text or email and can manage their profile on the KMM website.

INN provides commuters and residents with a central, easy to access information page personalized for their needs. For example, a commuter who lives in Cranbury and commutes to North Brunswick could register for not only traffic alerts, but could register for the municipal alerts for both townships. During emergencies, the commuter will receive the latest information on current road status and other information relevant to the origin and destination points.

Current ETN members have been automatically transferred to the new system without disruption in their selected customized alerts. Already, many have begun to take advantage of new types of alerts INN provides, and it’s all at no cost to subscribers.

We can’t control forces of nature but we can stay informed and connected. The KMM staff, like many of the commuters who use our services, understand the need to continually improve upon programs like INN, and we are committed to providing the most comprehensive program we can. Join INN and register for the Middlesex County Information Notification Network by visiting kmm.org/inn.

Drive Safe to Work – This Week and Every Week!

poster-webWhether you are driving for work, to and from work, or even to the grocery store, the time you spend in your vehicle can be the most dangerous part of your day. That is why this [next] week we will be observing Drive Safely Work Week, the annual safe-driving campaign sponsored by the Network of Employers for Traffic Safety (NETS.)

This year’s theme is Gear up for safe driving: Mind – Body – Vehicle.  You likely already know that vehicle maintenance is an important part of a safe trip. This year’s campaign will highlight how being mindful of physical and mental wellness—along with the “health” of your vehicle—are all connected in making us safer, more attentive drivers.

Among other things, we’ll cover tips for getting better sleep, limbering up before getting be hind the wheel, strategic snacking, the importance of regular vision screening, making sure you have the best fit to your vehicle and that your vehicle is fit for a safe trip.

If you are presently committed to health and wellness, you’ll discover how some of the things you are already doing positively affect your driving. But chances are everyone will find an area in which they might improve—as well as an opportunity to share some relatively simple actions with friends and family to help them be safer behind the wheel.

In addition to always wearing a seat belt, proper maintenance of mind, body and vehicle can go a long way toward getting you to where you’re going safely.  We trust you’ll find the week to be interesting, informative and most likely even a little fun.

Visit kmm.org and take the pledge to Drive Safe to Work – This week and every week to follow!

 

Post written by trafficsafety.org

Keep Your Eyes Up!

Woman On Her Cell PhoneWhat happens when Old Bridge High School 10th graders navigate an obstacle course containing a stop sign, traffic circle, pedestrians in a crosswalk and a traffic light, all while performing a math problem on a calculator?

KMM joined Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in conducting a Distracted Driver/Pedestrian Program and the results were not surprising!   Of the 200 students who walked the course, only a handful received a perfect score.  When evaluated after the program, the students never realized the mistakes they made while concentrating on their calculations. The results were indeed sobering.

The program is designed to educate students about the dangers of being distracted while driving or being a pedestrian.  And since Middlesex County carries the #1 rank in the state for pedestrian accidents, the need to start educating our younger generation is important.

Remember, regardless of our age, we all need to be aware of our surroundings when out on the roads and concentrate on getting to our destination safely.