Bonfire Safety

As the air turns colder and crisp,  bonfires are a great way to enjoy the falling temperatures. There’s nothing quite as cozy as a fire on a cool night, but it presents safety hazards. Keep these tips in mind when it comes to fire use:

Never leave a burning fire unattended. Always make sure a fire is completely out before leaving it alone. In addition, keeping a fire in its proper place by using a fireplace screen or bonfire set up, helps keep the fire out of the open.

Fire can spread easily, so where and how you build your bonfire is important. Build the bonfire away from sheds, fences, and trees to avoid anything catching flames. It’s best to have a designated fire area that is in the clear open. When it comes to burning the fire, only burn dry material like wood and paper to avoid tons of smoke. Liquids on top of fires will either put the fire out or start huge flames, which can become dangerous.

Most importantly, keep a bucket of water or garden hose nearby. A fire can get out of hand quickly so it is always important to be prepared for emergencies. If a real emergency does occur, calling the fire department is your best source for safety.

And… we would be remiss if we didn’t remind everyone about candle use:

Candles are a great way to give a room that warm glow, but they can also cause fires. According to the National Candle Association, almost 10,000 home fires start with improper candle use. Never leave candles or fires burning if you go out or go to sleep.

Autumn Driving Safety Tips

There’s nothing more beautiful than an evening drive during the fall season, but this season brings more hazards for drivers than you may think. Being aware of the potential dangers while on the road can help keep you safe and prevent accidents.

The changing colors and falling leaves are what autumn is all about. However, as leaves begin to fall they litter the roads, making streets slick while obscuring your vision. Traffic lines, street signs, and other pavement markings become hard to see. Be aware of limitations in your visibility and slow down if you can’t see well.

With the days getting shorter and more storms approaching, you could find yourself commuting to or from work in the dark. This makes it more difficult to see children playing or pedestrians walking and biking. Using dimmed headlights in bad weather or low visibility is a good way to stay seen while on the roads.  Children also love to play in piles of leaves, so use extra caution whenever you see leaves piled at curbside.

Together, we are all responsible – as drivers and pedestrians, to make sharing the roads safe and efficient.

Share the Road. Share the Responsibility

Drivers and pedestrians share the responsibility of keeping themselves and others on the roads safe. Pedestrians should follow certain safety practices to help ensure their own safety when sharing the roadways. Here are some useful tips and guidelines to follow as a pedestrian:

Be Visible. You can do this by wearing bright-colored clothing during the day and reflective colored clothing at night. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 32% of pedestrian-auto accident fatalities occur between 8 pm and 11:59 pm. The use of flashlights and reflective stickers can help make you visible during these late hours.

Avoid Distractions. It’s time to put down your phone and other electronic devices. The use of electronics is a daily part of life, but they distract your attention. When you decide to walk and text or listen to music through headphones, your attention focuses on that instead of the possible street signs and vehicles surrounding you. As a pedestrian, your eyes and ears are your best way to keep safe.

Use Caution. Before crossing the street always look left, then right, and left again. Make sure traffic has come to a complete stop before proceeding. You should cross only at intersections or street corners with crosswalks. By doing this, motorists should see you coming well in advance.

Remember, you as a pedestrian have a job to be seen and be alert at all times!

Fall Safety Tip Series

As the air turns cooler and leaves fall from the trees, it’s important to keep a few important fall safety tips in mind. This is why we have created our Fall Season Safety Tip Series! Our five blogs will cover the most important things to focus on during this year’s Fall season. We will cover the topics:

  1. Pedestrian Safety
  2. Driving Safety
  3. Weather
  4. Fire Use
  5. Lawn Maintenance

Make sure you stay connected with our KMM Website as well as our social media platforms to stay connected and informed! We will be posting a blog each week for the rest of the Fall.

A Farewell Post from our Intern

As summer comes to a close, we share with you a heartfelt post from our intern, Tyler.  We have been fortunate to have Tyler on our staff for the past few summers and we wish we much success in all of her future endeavors.

After three summers Interning with KMM, as my term comes to an end, I am writing to say goodbye. I am so fortunate to have found this position right after high school in 2016. Never having a job before, I must say that I was pretty nervous to take on this role.

I am extremely proud of the work that I have done as well as the things I’ve accomplished while being at KMM. From starting with a blog post a week to creating a new Distractive Driving flyer, helping update the KMM Website, and working different Bike Rodeos, I’d say that my time here was well worth it.

Working with the KMM staff has been fantastic! Getting to know each member has helped me gain new connections as well as friends. They have all taught me valuable life lessons and for that, I am grateful. I can’t thank Cristina Fowler enough for her help and guidance throughout my time at KMM. She’s a wonderful boss, mentor, and friend.

As I move onto the next chapter of my life, graduating from college is next on my agenda. I will be graduating from Long Island University- Brooklyn, with my Bachelors in Health Science and minor in Psychology. I am not sure what the future holds once I graduate, but I do know that I’ll have friends at KMM to update along the way. Thank you all for everything!

-Tyler  (Intern)

Fishing Trip Tips

As we head into the last week of summer, back to school is on everyone’s mind. BUT before summer ends, grab your friends and family and have a go at fishing! After all, August is National Fishing Month so what better way is there to celebrate other than doing just that?

It does not matter what age you are, or what previous experience you have. Fishing can be for everyone! Here are some tips to help you plan for the perfect fishing day:

Understand the basics. Get familiar with such tasks as adding fishing bait to the hooks, tying the knots and casting your line. These tasks are essential in order to fish.

Location. Have an idea of where/when you would like to fish and do research. Some places require permits in order to fish on the property, but many local ponds and waterfronts do not require this information.

Check the weather. An overcast day can lead to some of the most successful fishing trips. If being in the rain isn’t your thing, fishing on a warm sunny day will also allow you to get a good catch.

Patience. This is what fishing is all about. Staying calm, cool and collected while waiting for that bite will make your fishing experience so much better.

With a little bit of knowledge, understanding, and patience you are ready to take a go at fishing!  Enjoy your trip and remember to drive safe and drive smart to and from your fishing trip!

Red, White And Blue! Let’s Celebrate!

As we get ready to celebrate Independence Day, many of us plan to attend fireworks displays, host or attend barbecues, or perhaps enjoy some fun in the water. No matter how or where you celebrate, KMM wants you to have a fun-filled and safe holiday!

Heading to a public firework display?  You should stay at least 500 feet away from the show and always be aware of your surroundings in case of any fireworks that may have been misfired.

Hosting or attending a barbecue?  Be sure to always have someone supervising the grill when heating up or in use. Keeping the grill out in the open is the best way to keep everyone safe since there is less likely of a chance for other objects to catch fire. If you’re the one doing the grilling, make sure you have clean hands before touching any food.

Hanging by the pool or taking a trip to the beach on your agenda?  Make sure you apply sunscreen prior to being exposed to the sun and reapply when needed. The temperature is always rising so drink water or eat fruits to stay hydrated. Swim sober and never alone. Having a friend with you in case of an emergency is the safest way to swim.

No matter what you do this Fourth of July, remember that the roads will be crowded. Be mindful of others, watch your speed, don’t use your cell phone while driving and most importantly, do not drink and drive.

Whatever your family tradition is on the Fourth of July, have fun, stay safe and celebrate America’s birthday!

Pick Up the Trash!

While there are many environmental challenges we face on a global level, what we do everyday can affect our environment globally and most importantly, locally.  One such action is picking up trash in our community.  Every piece of trash we pick up helps to keep our neighborhoods clean and safe.

We challenge you to make a difference.  Here’s how:

  1. Find a local clean-up event.  There are many happening during the month of April.  Check with your local townships or environment commissions for dates.
  2. Take a Walk with a Trash Bag and Gloves. With so many of us taking walks in and around our neighborhood, designate one walk per month to collect the trash you see along your path.  Be sure to wear gloves and bring two or three trash bags to collect and separate the trash.

Small gestures can have big impacts.  Don’t underestimate the power you have to change your neighborhood, community and Mother Earth.

Grab your sneakers ~ And Walk!

Grab your sneakers and take a walk…on National Walking Day.  According to the American Heart Association, the event is celebrated on April 1st, but some sources say it’s celebrated on the first Wednesday in April.  We at KMM think regardless of what day it falls on, everyone should walk!

By committing to walking at least 30 minutes, you can get healthier and raise awareness about the importance of physical activity. On this day, millions of people throughout the United States will come together to take steps to live a healthier life for themselves, their families and their communities. You can celebrate the day in the workplace, at schools, in neighborhood walking groups and clubs and communities. 

Here are 3 tips on how to participate in National Walking Day, today and really, all year long.

Form a walking group with your neighbors.  Commit to meeting 3-5 times a week and walk different routes in your neighborhood.  Not only are you getting exercise, but you are engaging within the community.

Plan a walking meeting.  Sometimes the best ideas come when you are exercising.  Instead of sitting around the table, have a staff meeting walking at lunch with your coworkers.  While it’s a more informal type of meeting, it could produce some unique ideas.

Create a walking challenge.    Whether with your neighbors, co-workers or people in your community, create a challenge to see who can walk the most steps in one month.  Determine a monetary amount to join and split the total money collected between the winner and a local charity or cause in your group’s name.  With so many apps and devices, you can track each other’s progress.

So lace up those sneakers and get out there and walk for your community and for your health.   Oh and remember to:

wear bright clothing

obey the rules of the road

…and most importantly, don’t text and walk.

 

Tune in to Mobility Matters

We are thrilled to share that KMM will be launching a radio show /podcast – Mobility Matters – on WCTC 1450 AM radio beginning in April 2019. Tune in on Wednesdays at 10 am. Join us as we talk to leading experts in the fields of transportation, sustainability, and economic development.