Avoid Tragedy During Prom Season!

Now that June is here, prom season is at it’s highest peak. It’s an event many teenagers diligently plan for months and eagerly await. However, all too often the excitement on prom night is overshadowed by a tragic event. IMG_7403

Vehicle accidents are the number one cause of death for young people aged 12 to 19. On prom night, it can be a particularly dangerous time with so many teens on the road late at night. According to AAA, 87% of teens reported that their friends have driven after drinking rather than calling home for a ride, just on prom night alone. On prom night, friends may try to use peer pressure to entice you to have a drink or two, but be sure to think about the dangers that come with underage drinking. Too many tragic incidents have already taken place where underage drinkers have gotten into driving accidents — causing lifelong injuries, paralysis, and for many even death.

For parents, make prom safety just as important as the dress your daughter will wear or the style of your son’s tuxedo. Giving teens your advice will play an important role when discussing teenage driving tips that might prevent them from becoming a tragic statistic on their prom night. Some tips you should cover are:

  1. Limit the number of kids in the car and make sure all passengers (including the driver) are wearing their seat belts.
  2. Instill the importance of concentration behind the wheel. Being distracted behind the wheel is a major cause of vehicle accidents, but its something that is very easy to avoid. Put down the phone, don’t listen to loud music and be sure to focus on the road.
  3. Discuss the dangers of drinking/drug use and driving. There will always be peer pressure and temptation on prom night. Be sure to remind your teen that the number one killer of teenagers is car accidents caused from driving under the influence.

Prom night is supposed to be something special and night full of great memories. As a teen you have your entire future ahead of you, so make sure it doesn’t get ruined by one night.

Memorial Day & Summer Kick-Off Driving Tips

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Memorial Day is a day of remembrance for those who have died in service and over the course of the years has been considered the unofficial  “kick-off” of the Summer season.  The day and long weekend are often marked by family gatherings, parades, barbecues, and road trips.  As a result, highways and local roads alike, see high volume of cars on the road along with traffic and impatient drivers. According to the National Safety Council, more than 400 people will be killed during their Memorial Day weekend travels.

When driving to your destination this weekend, here are a few tips to help insure you have a fun and safe travel weekend:

 

  1. Buckle Up  Always wear your seat belt on every trip and make sure your passengers are wearing theirs. If you are traveling with children, make sure they are restrained in safety seat that is appropriate for their height, age and weight.
  2. Don’t get Distracted  Never use your cell phone while driving, even if your hands are free. Avoid listening to loud music and eating during your drive, these can be more distracting than you think.
  3. Take Breaks  Get plenty of sleep and take regular breaks to avoid fatigue while on the road. If you know you have a long trip ahead of you, plan to have another driver to switch off with or plan to make a few rest stops during your travels.
  4. Plan Ahead  Don’t be in a rush to get to your destination. There will be plenty of cars on the road so it is important to keep a safe distance and go the speed limit while driving.  If you know you will be going to a party or gathering, always assign an alcohol and drug-free driver or arrange alternate transportation. Impairment begins with the first drink you have and its not worth getting behind the wheel afterwards.

Make sure you have fun by planning ahead so you, your family, and friends are sure to have a great time!

 

 

Winter is Here!

Car tires on winter road covered with snow

The winter is upon us and sooner or later, New Jersey will see itself covered in a freezing blanket of billowy snow. But as New Jersians, life doesn’t just stop because of a few flakes (or feet) of the white stuff. Getting your car “winter ready” before the first snow will ensure you’re ready to face the road ahead. Ensure vehicle fluids are changed, tires are checked or replaced, and ensure all exterior lights are in proper working order. Then follow these driving tips if you need to travel in the cold and snow:

  • Make sure your tires are properly inflated. Most vehicles keep the tire pressure information on the driver side door panel.
  • Check and replace (if necessary) windshield wipers.
  • Top off wiper fluid.
  • Keep your gas tank at least half full.
  • Do not use cruise control in wet, wintery, icy weather.
  • Avoid hard breaking in wet weather as this can make your vehicle spin out of control.
  • Look and steer in the direction you want to go.
  • The normal dry pavement following distance of three to four seconds should be increased to eight to ten seconds.
  • Keep non-clumping kitty litter or wood chips in the trunk of your vehicle. This will help your tires gain traction if you become stuck in snow.
  • When traveling long distances, make sure to keep a blanket, flash light, water, and snacks in your vehicle in case you become stranded.
  • When in doubt, stay home. If driving conditions make it extremely difficult to travel, please do not attempt to go out.

For more information on winter driving visit http://exchange.aaa.com/safety/roadway-safety/winter-driving-tips/#.WG0-FxsrJPY

Keep the Privilege – Drive by the Rules!

Picture Source: https://www.lakecountyfl.gov/media/news_releases/news_release.aspx?id=1962

Picture Source*

Did you know that motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teens ages 14-18 in the US?

In fact, in 2014, there were a total of 2,614 teen drivers (ages 15-19) involved in fatal crashes. There was an estimated 130,000 teens injured in motor vehicle crashes. Would you be prepared if your child was seriously injured in a motor vehicle crash?

A recent survey done by the National Center for Health Statistics, shows that only 25% of all parents have a serious talk with their children about the key components of driving; the positives and the dangers that they can face while on the road. This need to change.  All parents need to take the time to talk with their children about the many dangers of driving including alcohol, seat belts, using your phone, speeding, and extra passengers.

Impaired driving is one of the main reasons why teen drivers get into car accidents. Their vision, hearing and all other senses are off. Not being able to focus the correct way can cause drivers to swerve into other lanes, avoid spot signs and even prevent them from seeing other cars/pedestrians coming their way.

Here are 3 things you should cover with  your teen drivers before they go out on the road:

1. No one should drive after drinking alcohol or using drugs.

2. Even if the driver seems okay, do not accept a ride from someone who has been drinking or using drugs.

3. If you feel unsafe, call a friend or family member to pick you up before you get on the road.

 

* https://www.lakecountyfl.gov/media/news_releases/news_release.aspx?id=1962